Gaming Life After Death

Gaming Life After Death

Games offer an easy way to take risks because we play with avatars and aren’t afraid to have them die, for we know that they will respawn and life will go on as long as we continue playing that specific game.  However, there is one game everyone plays that doesn’t have a respawn option.  No, I am not talking about State of Decay with it’s permadeath.  I am talking about the game with the most realistic graphics you’ve ever seen.  A game called, “Life.”

No Respawn, What Now?

With all major consoles offering digital content and said content becoming more mainstream, few gamers are thinking about what will happen to all of their purchased content posthumus.  As a gamer who actively purchases online games and their DLC, should anything happen to me, I am the only member of my family who has my Xbox, PS4, Steam, and other platform’s usernames and passwords.  Social media accounts, such as Facebook and Twitter, do have a process to follow to have a deceased account be closed.  This usually involves having a loved one send those companies proof of death via an online obituary or other form of verification.  While having an account closed is ideal for social media, a gamer’s username and password for their platform seems more fitting to be inherited rather than simply having it vanish into limbo.

Back in the Day…

If these were the early days of gaming when most of the gaming media was physical, being in a situation where a gamer passed away had an easy solution; that gamer’s games would just be handed down to the next of kin and they could do with it what they wanted.  With digital games, it doesn’t quite work that way.

A Kind of Respawn

It’s not talked about often, considering how long the internet has been around, but there are ways of leaving a digital inheritance behind.  The safest of ways would be to include your usernames and passwords to all of your accounts individually in a sealed envelope.  This envelope would then be given to a family member that you trust and ask them not to open it until after you have passed away.  Though this is one of the safest ways to handle the situation, it is not the most ideal, as passwords often change and are updated as the years go by.  Ideally, you want to give that kind of a letter to a lawyer to hold on for you as part of your will.  However, the problem still remains...your passwords are updated constantly.  That’s where digital passwords vaults come into place.  Two that stand out from searching the web are LastPass and Dashlane.  These services will ask you to create one extremely safe (and long) password that you have to remember, but it’s the only one that you need to worry about.  LastPass itself suggests that you can use part of the lyrics to a song, although in my case, I would choose my favorite line from a video game.  Then, you need to enter all of your passwords for any online service, be it a console or other form of social media.  After entering the information, it is encrypted and securely stored for you.  These services allow you to auto-generate random passwords for these sites if you want them to, but your master password would stay the same.  Dashlane offers a service where it will send out an email to specific family members you choose in case of an emergency.  Both services have free options, but to get the best service, there are premium choices.  As of the writing of this article, LastPass is 12 dollars a year (most approachable) while Dashlane is 40 dollars a year.  Which one you choose, if any, is up to what suits your needs best.  

Press X to Continue

Death is something most of us don’t want to think about.  With many of the 70s, 80s, and 90s gamers having or starting families, it is important to know that their families can have access to a big part of our lives, our games.  Digital games seem to be the way of the future, and they are a very convenient way of keeping things accessible from many platforms to us.  Should anything happen, it’s good to know that there are services that can give easier access to our digital content to our loved ones who can then see how we lived in the various worlds that we spent our times in and possibly even continue the adventures we started but didn’t get to finish.  In a way, permadeath won’t be a thing for gamers as we can continue living through the games we leave as inheritance behind.

Noe Monsivais (Trobadour_XP)

is an English Literature teacher at an early college campus by day. He is a YouTube content creator and is currently working on getting his Masters in Educational Technology and Leadership. His favorite thing about people is when they #KeepitTRO (True, Respectful, Original). You can follow him and his crazy antics at:

Twitter: @Trobadour_XP

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Noe Monsivais

Noe Monsivais (Trobadour_XP) is an English Literature teacher at an early college campus by day. He is a YouTube content creator and is currently working on getting his Masters in Educational Technology and Leadership. His favorite thing about people is when they #KeepitTRO (True, Respectful, Original). You can follow him and his crazy antics at:

Twitter: @Trobadour_XP

Instagram: Trobadour_XP